For six consecutive years and counting, the emerging automotive force that is Subaru has increased its total sales and forecasted a target of 460,000 units in the United States for 2014. This month, Subaru of America announced that its sales objective needed to be adjusted, not because business was slowing down, but because its momentum now has it on pace to crush its previous target. Through August, with sales up 19% year-to-date, the automaker elevated its forecasted sales figure to 500,000 units, a feat it has never accomplished before in America. With the company’s deliveries already at a record pace and continuing upward into unfamiliar territory, it is interesting to see what has transpired up until now for Subaru and what can be anticipated in the coming years.

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Incredibly, just eight months into the year, Subaru sold nearly 334,000 vehicles, which is roughly on par with the brand’s entire 12-month haul two years ago. While that level of success is remarkable in and of itself, how efficiently Subaru has operated to this point is even more significant. Just as its sales increased for six years straight, Subaru’s average incentive spending per unit decreased every year since 2007, with spending down 50% by the conclusion of 2013, per Autodata. Meanwhile, the industry average fell only 7.7% from its high point in 2008, revealing that although the industry has cut back on spending over the years, Subaru has been especially frugal, but mainly because demand for the brand’s vehicles has been so fervent that sales growth remains stellar sans incentives. This year has been no different for Subaru as its year-to-date spending per unit fell to only $773 through August, down 18%, while the industry’s average incentives have climbed to $2,745 per unit, up 7.5%.

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From an inventory perspective, Subaru has been operating with the slimmest supply of vehicles in the industry for quite some time. Comparing days’ supply in August for Subaru versus the industry over the last several years, the Japanese automaker’s inventory plummeted in 2009 and has remained low ever since, down to 17 days last month. The industry on the other hand has mostly maintained an average inventory level north of 50 days since 2007, which shows how starkly distinct Subaru’s business performance has been relative to much of the competition.

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The lack of inventory also is not a derivative of inefficient production at the company’s Lafayette, Indiana assembly plant either as the automaker has effectively been running at maximum capacity in recent years. Even with only two Subaru models, the Legacy and Outback, currently being built at the facility upon the discontinuation of the Tribeca SUV, Subaru is manufacturing every unit possible to meet consumer demand in the wake of falling inventory levels nationwide. With an outlook for continued sales success in the years ahead, Subaru was pushed to reach an agreement with minority shareholder Toyota to move Camry production out of the Subaru of Indiana (SIA) plant at the end of their contract in 2016.

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SIA will expand its production capacity from its current 170,000-unit level with a $400 million investment that will boost output by 300,000 units. Additionally, the departure of the Camry will free up another 100,000 units of production, which will allow Subaru to begin producing the Impreza and the potential Tribeca replacement by the end of 2016. By 2018, the facility could also begin manufacturing the XV Crosstrek, allowing the automaker to source the majority of its highest-selling models out of its American facility instead of importing them from Japan. The promise of eliminating exchange rate risk while cutting various costs including those related to logistics will allow the automaker to get more vehicles onto dealer lots. Increased sales and greater profits would propel Subaru to new heights, but more importantly, would open up opportunities never afforded by the brand in the past. As impressive as Subaru’s products and business operations have been recently, it’s hard to imagine how much better than can get, but it will be fun to see what happens next once the small Japanese automaker has a larger influx of cash to play with.