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Acura recently released pricing information for its much anticipated 2017 NSX and unsurprisingly the supercar will carry a lofty price tag to match its high expectations. Pricing will start at $157,800, including destination, but those looking for all the trimmings will have to pony up $207,500. While the newest NSX is certainly a vehicle only afforded by individuals with deep pockets, it is important to remember the original model wasn’t exactly cheap either despite having a much lower MSRP. What made the previous generation NSX particularly special, however, was its ability to hold its value over the years, which is something the new NSX will try to duplicate in addition to meeting its obvious design and performance goals.

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The original Acura supercar debuted for the 1991 model year — a year in which NSX registrations peaked at 2,841 units. Registration counts would eventually taper off to about a couple hundred units per model year over the vehicle’s last several years in production, ending with just 239 registrations in model year 2005. With only 8,325 units registered in the span of 15 model years, it’s debatable whether the original NSX was a commercial success or not, but with such a small number of vehicles in operation, current owners are rewarded with strong resale values resulting from excellent value retention.

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Incredibly, the original 1991 Acura NSX — a 25-year-old vehicle — currently retains over 52% of its $60,000 MSRP for an “average retail” model according to NADA Guides. All 1991 model year NSXs are by far the most available first-generation models in the used car market due to the supercar’s relatively high retail sales that year (yet those cars’ value retention figures range from a healthy 40% for “low retail” units to 67% for “high retail” units). Of course, it must be noted that $60,000 in 1990 equates to roughly $109,000 in today’s dollars, however, even 29% retention for an “average retail” model is spectacular for such an old vehicle.

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On the other hand, as good as the 1991 Acura NSX is, final production units from model year 2005 are essentially gold as far as retention is concerned. Even “average retail” models retain 75% of their original MSRP over a decade later, while “low retail” and “high retail” units exhibit value retention between 65% and 87%, respectively. Looking at things in today’s dollars, the 2005 Acura NSX had an MSRP of just under $112,000, which would put its “average retail” retention at a still robust 60%. What’s particularly interesting is how the 2005 model’s MSRP was less than 3% higher than the 1991 model after accounting for inflation. This basically means final production models are a steal compared to the originals considering their prices were nearly identical — yet 2005 models are newer, have updated design elements and upgraded mechanics and performance.

Ultimately, the first-generation NSX was not only an extraordinary vehicle back in the day, but also a great buy as is reflected by its high value retention today. The next-generation Acura NSX may be a vastly different beast in many regards, including its elevated sticker price, however, it carries on the legacy of a legendary nameplate that continues to resonate with car enthusiasts today. While it’s difficult to predict whether the incoming NSX will have as much lasting power as the original, it may be worth the gamble to purchase Acura’s new supercar and hold onto it. The reward would be getting to enjoy a potentially historic vehicle for many years while seeing its value seemingly never drop compared to almost all other vehicles on the road.