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The 2017 Nissan GT-R was revealed this past March at the 2016 New York International Auto Show.

Earlier this year at the 2016 New York International Auto Show, Nissan revealed its updated GT-R supercar, which for years has been known as one of the most downright menacing vehicles on the market. Fittingly nicknamed, “Godzilla,” its talents are extraordinary on almost any paved terrain. In order to continue its competitive run against all other marques, the vehicle has become stronger and more powerful than ever. With an additional 20 horsepower and 4 lb.-feet of torque over the outgoing model, the 2017 iteration boasts a whopping 565 horsepower combined with 467 lb.-feet of torque. The power is made possible by increased boost to the car’s 3.8-liter twin-turbo V6, as well as a modified individual ignition-timing control. Additional improvements to the all-wheel drive 2+2 coupe include a new titanium exhaust, retuned suspension, acoustic glass windshield, new sound insulation and active noise cancellation. It goes without saying the supercar’s ante has been upped — albeit at a cost. As Nissan’s halo car price continues to increase, it’s only natural for aspiring GT-R owners to wonder if used prices follow suit. An analysis of retention values reveals some interesting results.

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Pictured in red and black GT-R uniforms are four of the five "Takumi" master mechanics who hand assemble every engine that powers Nissan's supercar.

That MSRP, it just keeps climbing.

The GT-R first entered the U.S. market as a 2009 model year vehicle with an advertised entry MSRP of $70,475, which came out to be $77,840 for a typically-equipped base model. Fast-forward to the 2016 model year and the base GT-R’s typically-equipped MSRP jumps to $103,660, reflecting a price increase of over 33%. However, when the trends in average typically-equipped MSRPs and average 3-year trade-in values are compared, we see a stark contrast in their movements as the former continues to increase each year, while the latter is nearly flat. As a result, average value retention for 3-year old models decreased each year, dropping by 16.3-percentage points from model year 2009 to 2013.

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What does demand look like?

Based on sales and lease penetration figures, the yearly price increases have done little to deter GT-R demand, if at all. Total sales have remained steady every calendar year — with an annual average of 1,239 units since 2009 — while lease penetration fell below 10% last year. The drop is well below its 14.5% average over that span. With such a small percentage of its customer base who have chosen to lease the supercar, the rise in lease payments over recent model years is not a big concern to dealers or consumers alike. New GT-R buyers continue to show up each year to dealer lots, which suggests a high price tolerance for the techno-laden coupe. However, with a drop in value retention each year, we learn more about demand on the used side of the market.

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How much have GT-R’s depreciated?

Average trade-in values for each model year have leveled off since the current-generation R35 GT-R went on sale in the U.S. This quasi-logarithmic pattern reveals that even though new vehicle prices have increased each year, their values quickly depreciate toward previous model years. This means the purchase of an older GT-R might be viewed as less value for the money. For example, after two years of depreciation, the value of a new typically-equipped MY2014 GT-R goes from $109,149 to just $64,825. That is lower than the 2-year average trade-in value of a MY2012 and nearly as low as the MY2011’s 2-year average trade-in value (even though they had lower typically-equipped MSRP’s of $93,497 and $85,340, respectively). The same thinking applies to a 3-year old MY2013, which has a lower 3-year average trade-in value than any model year before it aside from MY2009.

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How far will prices drop?

Even though high-priced models tend to lose their value at faster rates than lower-priced, higher-volume vehicles, Nissan’s Godzilla is reaching a resistance level — perhaps in the upper $30,000 range — where the rate of depreciation has drastically slowed. While most cars tend to sell for less and less as they age, the GT-R is unique since its price will only fall so far before the supercar becomes such a bargain that enthusiasts can’t pass it up.

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Which model year GT-R gives the best performance for lowest price?

Since its price floor is almost reached, older model year examples of Nissan’s halo car provide much less bang for the buck than their successors, especially when you consider the many upgrades and add-ons included each subsequent model year. Though all GT-R models deliver incredible performance regardless of model year or specification — and due to the way value retention over the first few years progressively worsened each successive model year — buyers looking to get the absolute best-performing GT-R for the lowest possible amount of money might consider younger examples from recent years.